Boring truths

In the 1980 science book Cosmos, Carl Sagan wrote about how a newspaper asked an astronomer to write a five hundred word article on whether there was life on Mars. The astronomer dutifully replied through telegram: “NOBODY KNOWS”, repeated two hundred and fifty times. It was the most honest answer possible, but people wanted answers nonetheless, […]

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Ready Player One Review

My formative teenage years coincided mostly in the 2000s, and feverishly playing World of Warcraft, Fable and Diablo — so even though I didn’t get most of the references to the Eighties, I totally understood and felt what they stand for. Ready Player One is a fantastic mixture of nostalgia and sci-fi, aptly labelled by […]

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The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck review

It’s entertaining and at times insightful, but this is hobbyist-psychology at best. What gives it away is Manson’s generalisation of all Russians; how they’re blunt and not trying to be nice, and how that proves they’re more trustworthy then American citizens — or the plethora of random anecdotes followed by “That’s basically how our brains work” […]

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Virtual Racing School case study

Online marketing is more simple than ‘experts’ make people believe, and to demonstrate that I’ve showed a simple campaign from Virtual Racing School on the biggest marketing blog from the Netherlands; Marketingfacts. With this article you do a campaign yourself within an hour, so you’ll learn how online advertising works, and what you can measure with […]

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Promoting Positivity

Since 1983, Provamel has been a pioneer of turning plants into delicious plant-based drinks and yogurt alternatives. All its products are organic and thus GMO free, produced in a CO2-neutral way, and all of Provamel’s soya, almonds, oats, rice and hazelnuts are sourced in Europe. In short – it’s tasty, good for you and the […]

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Young China review

Dychtwald’s writes well and his sentences have a neat flowing rhythm to them, although he jumps from topic to topic — back and forth — and does so even within the twelve loosely-bundled chapters of the book. ‘Young China’ feels like a loosely weaved net of anecdotes, which are rich in detail and probably representative for […]

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Mapping values

The first commercial computer sold in the United States was the UNIVAC in 1951. Supplied with 125 kilowatt, it could do 1,905 operations per second, which translated into 0.015 operations per watt-second. That last metric wasn’t very important for the UNIVAC, since power wasn’t a bottleneck as much as performance or weight was. With 5,000 […]

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LIFE’S for living

There’s a sport that’s more popular than football, that has more participants than basketball, and that can be more beneficial than going to the gym. It doesn’t feature in the Olympics, and it doesn’t need medals. Lotto, the leading Italian company in footwear and clothing for sports and leisure, believes it’s time to embrace the […]

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Turning your logo upside down for equality

Yesterday, plenty of brands jumped onto the International Women’s Day bandwagon, and among the worst I’ve seen are McDonald’s, which turned it’s golden arches upside down, and BrewDog, which released a pink label for their beer. If only equality was that easy. While these are extremely superficial attempts to grab some retweets and likes, they […]

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Climbing the pyramid: Advertising in a richer world

Apart from a few (looking at you, CO2-levels), all statistic show an insane progress in the world. Extreme poverty fell from 37% in 1990 and is well under 10% now; illiteracy fell from 65% in 1950 to just 15% now; and average life expectancy upon birth went up from 31 years in 1900 to 71.5 […]

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